Damien Hirst

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Damien Hirst

Messaggio da leggere da hombre sincero » 18/05/2005, 21:37

Damien Hirst ? uno dei pi? popolari e controversi artisti della scena dell?arte contemporanea. La sua arte ? intrisa delle inquietudini e delle contraddizioni del nostro tempo. Le sue composizioni e le installazioni di oggetti utilizzati nella vita quotidiana, ricreano microcosmi isolati sotto vetro (vedi la serie di animali morti e conservati in formaldeide); questi microcosmi ricostruiscono e rispecchiano il ciclo della vita e il conflitto esistenziale con il quale tutti noi ci confrontiamo ogni giorno.
Trovato in rete

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R: Damien Hirst

Messaggio da leggere da hombre sincero » 18/05/2005, 21:41

..dimenticavi Pharmacy...
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R: Damien Hirst

Messaggio da leggere da carlo » 19/05/2005, 0:41

di suo conoscevo solo gli animali sotto vetro:

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che dire...
proprio un bel tipo:

http://www.clivearrowsmith.co.uk/galler ... 1-copy.jpg

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R: Damien Hirst

Messaggio da leggere da hombre sincero » 19/05/2005, 19:04

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R: Damien Hirst

Messaggio da leggere da hombre sincero » 19/05/2005, 19:09

Intervista a damien Hirst trovata in rete:

Damien Hirst (b. 1965, as we say in art circles) is from Leeds, but we won't hold that against him. When he was about sixteen he went to the local morgue and had a friend take photographs of him with some dead heads. This presaged a rocketing art career that lifted off in 1988 when he put together an exhibition called Freeze. It was in a warehouse in London's newly-booming docklands, and featured work by him and a dozen of his ambitious contemporaries at Goldsmith's College. The show hit the zeitgeist firmly on the pulse, and Damien followed up with One Hundred Years and A Thousand Years, huge glass vitrines holding maggots, flies, cows heads, and insectocuters - life cycle and fly holocaust enacted before our very eyes. Since then he's famously immersed sharks and bisected cattle in formaldehyde, and become Britain's most famous artist since David Hockney. BBC1 made a television programme about him in February 1994, Moral Sense spoke to him on Friday April 29, 1994, four days before the opening of his second foray into exhibition curating: Some went mad... some ran away at the Serpentine Gallery in Kensington Gardens. It was about 12.15pm, Damien had already spoken to several press people, and was also trying to sort out putting the exhibition up. We sat on the grass outside the gallery. It was a hot, sunny day.

Since you've been on TV, have you had people recognising you?

I don't know if I would have done, but I've been in Berlin, so I've not really been around. And when I have been around, I've been inside, like here at the Serpentine, installing. But my mum has, in Leeds.

What sort of reaction has she got?

Well, she said the main thing was, a lot of her friends who she hasn't seen for a long time call her up. People she hasn't heard from, people she was at school with, things like that. She works in a Citizens Advice Bureau so she has a lot of people coming in, they feel like they've seen her before, then they say, 'weren't you on telly the other night... with the weird son.'

Do you ever get negative reactions because of the work you've done, have you ever been threatened?

Not directly. A lot of people get mixed up about the work. We have had some animal rights things but they all get the facts wrong so they have to go away looking a bit stupid. I did a butterfly show in Berlin, and we had a guy who's an expert on butterflies; who bred them all and who looks after them all in the space. So they got to him and thought he was the artist, and just said 'look this is really cruel, what are you doing to these butterflies?' And he just said 'I'm the butterfly breeder, I'm the guy that he's got in to do them'. So we had that. Then we had something with the shark, somebody came in and said 'It's a great white and it's a protected species, what are you doing?' And we said its not, its a tiger shark. I think they smeared dog shit in the gallery, or something. It was a long time ago. But I wasn't there. It's the people in the gallery who get to sort all that out.

So you don't have to deal with this on a day to day basis at all.

No, I kind of hear about it afterwards, so it's a bit indirect.

Were you influenced by Jaws? When you were younger you were probably about the right age for Jaws-mania.

Yeah, I think so, but I think it's the same kind of thing, that kind of mania, or even just general hysteria about sharks. That's why I chose it as an object, because it contains that kind of fear. That's why it's that kind of size as well. I wanted a shark that's big enough to eat you, and in a large enough amount of liquid so that you could imagine you were in there with it. I can't deny it's influenced by Jaws. But I'm more interested in why people are frightened by Jaws and why Jaws was such a hit than saying Spielberg's my main influence.

A lot of your work is extreme in some ways, but are there things that you'd want to do that you can't because of taboos?

I think there are but I think I've been lucky, I think you can find a way to do anything. I had an idea where I wanted to do a man and a woman having sex, cut in half down the middle. Like you always see those diagrams which explain how babies are made, and they're always so cold. I just thought it'd be quite good to do something like that. But you have a real problem because of using human bodies. But if you actually wanted to make a piece like that, and it wasn't an artwork, you could do it. If it was a study, a specimen, you could make it and you could have it in a medical school. But you couldn't have it on public display, I don't think. But I don't know if it would work. It's a funny idea.

You'd like to do it if you could.

Well I just thought it would look quite good. You know, there's that Jeff Koons piece of him and Cicciolina, I thought it would be like a funny version of that. I'd call it Creation Explained, or Explored, I don't know... you could walk through the middle, like walking into the bedroom while your mum and dad are in bed or something. It's a difficult one, I guess I'll never make it...

You took those pictures in the morgue, ages ago.

They were never really artworks, it was just a photo I took, but because a lot of people wanted the photograph I just made a small edition of the photo. In retrospect it was quite funny that I was making all this work, but I'd actually done this when I was sixteen, in Leeds.

Do you have a sick sense of humour?

Yeah, maybe a morbid sense of humour, I wouldn't say it was sick, but maybe other people would. I like bad jokes.

Can you think of any that you could tell us?

I just like them all, I like the worst ones, I like the ones that make you go urgh. But I can't think of any offhand.

Where do you get your dead stuff from?

From Guildford, from a knackers yard. From a guy, they just get, how does he describe it? He says 'the animals that fell down'. But they get all the dead ones and have to chop them up for dog food. But it's a lot easier because if you go to an abattoir where it's mass-producing and mass-slaughter it's really difficult to go in and say 'I just want one.' It's a lot easier, it's not really for moral reasons.

You've got a sheep in the latest exhibition.

Yeah, called Away From The Flock. It's just in-between a lamb and a sheep; didn't quite make it to being a sheep. I quite like it 'cause it's in the park, and I have it looking out of the window at the grass so... you said 'Do I have a sick sense of humour?' I guess there's a bit of a sick sense of humour in that. Gazing out at the pasture.

On which it will never feed.

Exactly.

How long are they going to last, these things. Are they well preserved?

There's a complicated thing that goes along with it. I've seen things that are 200 years old, in formaldehyde. They're preserved, as long as they're kept in formaldehyde then they'll last indefinitely. And they're making new chemicals all the time that are better than that. But for me, from my point of view, I don't mind if it falls over... if you break the glass you replace the glass, if the sheep falls out you can always get a new sheep. I guess in a thousand years, people probably won't know what the hell it is. Will people still want it? They'll last for longer than my lifetime, that's good enough for me.

What was the last thing you saw which you considered obscene?

I don't really think like that. What was the last thing that I saw that I didn't like, I could maybe answer. But I could never make a judgement that something was obscene. If I didn't like it, I wouldn't look at it. But a bad thing: I saw a picture in a medical book of a woman who'd been raped and stabbed - a picture of her hand. Which was really bad, 'cause the hand was all cut, and that was because obviously if you're getting stabbed you try to grab the blade of the knife, so you get your hands cut. And the actual thought of that going on, I never actually realised, but when you see that image it kind of drives it home in quite a bad way.

Do you look at a lot of medical books?

I used to do. I had a collection of them. But I always liked the fact that you get these totally unacceptable images, but they're taken by a really expensive photographer, with great light, and in terms of the quality of the photograph it's a great photograph, but in terms of imagery it's unacceptable, and I like that contradiction.

This exhibition: 'Some went mad... some ran away,' where does the title come from?

It's from an essay by an artist who's in the show. It's just an excerpt. It's called 'Some went mad, some ran away, some remained faithful unto physical death, modern mystics without God.' So it was a complicated title, but when he said it to me I just liked 'Some went mad... some ran away,' and I just thought it would make a good title for an exhibition. I think it's got a Keystone Cops quality to it. And I think with the activity of all the work in the show, it's kind of running around, and all on top of each other and underneath, so I quite like it. It's good to have a title that's not just one word. If you're gonna title it, you might as well try and say something.

Did you have anything in mind before you started putting the exhibition together?

I always feel like the art's there and I just see it, so it's not really a lot of work. And I've just been travelling round the world, seeing exhibitions, meeting artists, and I met some people I liked and then just at some point I said 'Hey, these things'd look great together.' And I thought, 'Ah, I've got that title, what if I used that title, and did this show.' Then it kind of builds itself after that.

Would you like to talk about some of the pieces that are in the show?

There's this large 12 foot shark which hangs from the ceiling, in a kind of wet suit, which was made by an American artist called Ashley Bickerton. I guess I did my shark, so I like it for that reason. It's a hammerhead shark and it's a really strange object 'cause, again it's on that point of where you don't know, is it a display thing or is it being tortured? And it's out of water, and it's a thing to look at: it's a weird object, but a sexy object as well. So that's the main thing you see when you walk in. And behind that you have a piece by Angus Fairhurst called Laura Loves Fish, which is of a deep sea diver underwater, which has had holes drilled in it and has clothing tags through it. And I quite like that because the diver's looking out, and you've got the shark in the middle, so when you walk in it's confusing. So you have to walk around it. You've got a thirteen foot orange Balzac, by another American called Michael Joo, which is made out of superball material, which hangs from the ceiling. A lot of people said that Balzac - it's based on the Rodin sculpture - was actually masturbating under the robes, it was about male creativity. So I guess he's kind of turned that upside down, that idea, somehow. It's a really kind of phallic thing anyway, he's changed the angle, so it looks a bit phallic.

Do you like work which is in some way related to your own work?

I think it's just, I really enjoy art, and I just hope that when people come and see the exhibition, I want them to be just grabbed and thrown around a bit by visual things. I wouldn't say it's like a movement or anything like that, it's just things I like. To me it's like, this is the kind of world I live in and these are all the people who are artists who are doing what I'm doing, but in their own way. There's a blue box, which is just a painted blue box, called Blue Box, which is outside. And just the simplicity of that seems kind of crazy 'cause it's so straightforward, and it's 25 feet by 20 feet by 9 feet, by Robert Peacock. And somebody was looking at it the other day and they went, 'Oh, it's lunatic asylum blue.' You ask the artist about it and he'll say, 'it's a blue box,' and somebody else looks at it, and they say lunatic asylum blue. So there are a lot of things like that that go on that are simple, and some of them are more complicated.

So how important is public response to your work?

I think it's just great that they have a response. I don't think it's important whether it's a good one or a bad one, really. I mean, people listen to music, and they like that, but I think in England, a lot of people don't like contemporary art. And I think, you know, I like it, so I can't understand it, I think if you're gonna have this stuff going in your ears, you might as well have some stuff going in your eyes. I think it's good. There's a lot of things that people don't like, I think it'd be difficult for anyone to go in and say they didn't like the whole thing, because it's enjoyable, it's like a funfair, I hope. I like it if kids like it. But it's pretty hard not to like a blue box.

People are threatened by it sometimes. People feel like someone's trying to put something over on them.

I know. I don't understand it, though. I think, why? When you go out and buy a record you don't go 'What are you trying to do, what is this noise?' you just listen to it and decide what you think, and I think people should do that with art. I guess it's the media that makes people suspicious of it. I mean it's not as bad in America or anywhere else as it is in England I don't think. It's a shame.

What sort of music do you listen to?

I guess all kinds. I don't know. I have a Californian girlfriend and she's into a lot of Californian bands so I listen to that. I don't really go out and buy my own, I listen to everybody else's. I liked The Beatles a lot when I was growing up. But I guess what I liked was the fact that they had short hair in the sixties and long hair in the seventies and they could do it, and they weren't embarrassed about it. It was that kind of growing up thing you did. I liked the development.

So are you modelling your career plan on them in some way?

Not really. I don't really have a career plan. I just do what everybody asks me to do, in terms of media and stuff. It'd be nice to make lots of money but it's quite difficult, because every time I make lots of money I make a bigger piece that costs lots of money.

So you're spending it as soon as you get it?

Yeah.

Do you take lots of drugs?

Er yeah, I'm trying not to. I guess so. Nothing really dangerous. I don't really buy any, but I have a lot of friends who do, so I go out sober and say I'm not gonna take any drugs and then I end up drunk and do it. And then wake up the next day and say I'm never doing that again.

What will it say on your gravestone?

I don't know, maybe I won't have one. I always liked what Bacon said; 'When I die just put me in a bag and throw me in the gutter.' I quite like that, but I haven't really thought about it.

You're not thinking of having yourself put into a large tank of formaldehyde.

Not really. But I did think of maybe doing...you know like Warhol made a lot of money and did really well on the portraits? I thought it might be nice to have a little line on the side going, just in case, of doing famous people's pets for them, in formaldehyde. But then I think the people who did it would be weirder than I was, to want it. I don't think I'd want my pet in formaldehyde, but I guess in America they would.


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Re: Damien Hirst

Messaggio da leggere da hombre sincero » 03/05/2008, 16:52

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For the Love of God
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Platinum, diamonds and human teeth
6 3/4 x 5 x 7 1/2 in. (17.1 x 12.7 x 19.1 cm)
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Re: Damien Hirst

Messaggio da leggere da carlo » 03/05/2008, 17:55

sta a roma in questi giorni alla gaegosian (mi pare si scriva così) ho intenzione di andarci spero di trovare il tempo

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Re: Damien Hirst

Messaggio da leggere da hombre sincero » 03/05/2008, 18:39

trova il tepo dai, così poi ci racconti
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Re: Damien Hirst

Messaggio da leggere da hombre sincero » 20/12/2009, 19:53

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